Benefits of Hiring a Co-op Student

What can a York Biochemistry student do for you?

The student has a solid foundation in both chemistry and biology as well as the supporting areas of mathematics, physics and computing. Most importantly, they have laboratory-based experience in both chemistry and biology encompassing familiarity with basic laboratory equipment and research techniques. Moreover, the student has taken a professional development course focused on communicating professionally and on the underlying educational objectives of co-operative education.

Students embarking on their first work term

The co-op student embarking on their first work term has generally completed at least the following courses:

  • First Year: Chemical Structure and Chemical Dynamics, Biology I - Cells, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Biology II - Evolution, Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation Biology, Physics, Applied Calculus I and II, and a computer science course
  • Second Year: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics, Research Methods in Cell and Molecular Biology, Introduction to Thermodynamics, Introductory Organic Chemistry I and II, Basic Inorganic Chemistry
  • An Introductory Professional Communications course and a liberal arts course of their choice

Senior Co-op Students

You will meet an individual who is beginning to develop deep specialized knowledge of biochemical processes, and who has significant laboratory and research skills developed through both academic courses and their previous co-op experience. It is possible the student has undertaken a research practicum that has further developed specialized laboratory skills.

Besides scientific skills and knowledge, you’ll encounter a well-rounded individual adept at working with others and contributing to group objectives.

The “senior” co-op student has in addition:

  • already developed a mature approach to the professional environment due to their first co-op experience,
  • taken courses such as Advanced Biochemistry, Molecular Biology I: Nucleic Acid Metabolism, Molecular Biology II: Regulation of Gene Expression, Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Macromolecules of Biochemical Interest, and Organic Chemistry III,
  • likely taken further elective courses in liberal arts and other sciences.

What can a York Biotechnology student do for you?

Students embarking on their first work term

The Biotechnology student embarking on their first work term will have a strong foundation in cellular and molecular biology as well as exposure to economics and professional ethics.

The student has laboratory-based experience in both chemistry and biology encompassing familiarity with basic laboratory equipment and research techniques. They are ready to build on that experience by rapidly adapting to any new lab environment.

Students will generally have completed the following courses:

  • Biology I - Cells, Molecular Biology and Genetics and Biology II - Evolution, Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation Biology;
  • Chemical Structure and Chemical Dynamics, introductory physics, introductory mathematics covering calculus and statistics, a computer science course
  • Introduction to Microeconomics, Introduction to Macroeconomics, Introduction to Applied Ethics;
  • Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics, Research Methods in Cell and Molecular Biology;
  • Introductory Organic Chemistry I and II, Analytical Chemistry;
  • An Introductory Professional Communications course and a liberal arts course of their choice

Senior Co-op Students

You will meet an individual who has significant laboratory and research skills developed through academic courses in both biology and chemistry and their previous co-op experience. It is possible the student has undertaken a research practicum that has further developed specialized laboratory skills. The student has knowledge and skills obtained from the preparatory and professional development co-op courses that allows them to contribute in a team environment and with an understanding of organizational processes.

The “senior” co-op student has in addition:

  • Taken courses such as Molecular Biology I: Nucleic Acid Metabolism, Molecular Biology II: Regulation of Gene Expression, Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Immunobiology, Virology, Advanced Biochemistry, Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis, Macromolecules of Biochemical Interest, and Bioanalytical Chemistry;
  • Taken further courses in liberal arts and other sciences.

What can a York Chemistry student do for you?

Students embarking on their first work term

You will meet an individual who is accustomed to communicating professionally, who has significant bench skills and familiarity with basic laboratory equipment, a solid understanding of the foundations of chemistry, and a breadth of knowledge in basic mathematics and science.

The co-op student embarking on their first work term has generally completed at least the following courses:

  • First Year: Chemical Structure and Chemical Dynamics, Applied Calculus I and II, Physics, and a computer science course
  • Second Year: Introduction to Thermodynamics, Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, Basic Inorganic Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry
  • An Introductory Professional Communications course and a liberal arts course of their choice

Some students, such as in the Pharmaceutical and Biological Chemistry stream, will have also taken the following courses: first year Biology I and II, Introductory Biochemistry, Cell Biology and Biochemistry I and II, Genetics and Research Methods in Cell and Molecular Biology

Senior Co-op Students

You will meet an individual who is beginning to develop deep specialized knowledge of chemical processes, with application to one or more areas, yet with an abiding interest in topics beyond the sciences.

The “senior” co-op student has in addition:

  • already developed a mature approach to the professional environment due to their first co-op experience,
  • taken courses such as Experimental Chemistry I and II, Physical Chemistry, Organic Chemistry II, Transition Metal Chemistry, Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis and other courses,
  • likely taken further courses in liberal arts and perhaps other sciences.

Some students interested in, say, materials chemistry will have taken further courses such as Physical Chemistry, Physical Inorganic Chemistry, and Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

Others interested in atmospheric chemistry will have taken courses such as Introductory Atmospheric Chemistry, Industrial and Green Chemistry, and Environmental Science.

Others, such as in the Pharmaceutical and Biological Chemistry stream, will have also taken courses such as Advanced Biochemistry, Macromolecules of Biochemical Interest, and Pharmaceutical Discovery.

What can a York Environmental Biology student do for you?

Students embarking on their first work term

The co-op student embarking on their first work term will have a solid grasp of biological principles with a focus on plants and animals and their interaction with the environment, principles of ecology and approaches to data collection and analysis. Extensive laboratory work is a component of many courses to the extent that students are well acquainted with practical skills.

Typically students will have completed many of the following courses:

  • Biology I - Cells, Molecular Biology and Genetics and Biology II - Evolution, Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation Biology;
  • Ecology, Statistics for Biologists, Plant Biology, Animals
  • introductory courses in physical geography, chemistry or physics, computing and mathematics
  • An Introductory Professional Communications course and a liberal arts course of their choice

Senior Co-op Students

After three years of study, when students embark on the second period of co-op work terms, you will meet a student well versed in theoretical concepts and practiced in the application of those concepts. All students will have taken a course in Population Ecology, and a selection of courses such as Processes of Evolution, Experimental Design for Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Biology in Environmental Management, Microbiology, Biogeography, Birds and the Environment, Conservation Biology, and Biodiversity. Some students will have taken at least one field course.

Students typically complement their specialized studies with a broad diversity of courses from liberal arts and other fields, and in the case of co-op students with specialized courses that focus on professional development for the workplace. The “senior” co-op student will bring an awareness of team work and organizational processes typical of public and private workplace environments gained from studies and from their first co-op experience.

What can a York Environmental Science student do for you?

Students who have completed two years of study will have a solid grasp of chemical and biological principles in addition to principles of physical geography. Students who focus on the physical environmental sciences will in addition have completed courses in earth and atmospheric science whereas those focusing on the life sciences stream will have completed courses in ecology, animals and plants. Extensive laboratory work is a component of many courses to the extent that students are well acquainted with practical skills.

Typically students will have completed many of the following courses:

  • Core Component: Physical Geography, The Hydrosphere; Introduction to Vegetation and Soils; Geomorphology I; Geomorphology II
  • Life Sciences stream: Biology I - Cells, Molecular Biology and Genetics; Biology II - Evolution, Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation Biology; Plant Biology; Animals; Ecology; Statistics for Biologists
  • Physical Sciences stream: Calculus I and II; Linear Algebra; Chemical Structure; Chemical Dynamics; Basic Inorganic Chemistry; Introductory Physics; Electricity and Magnetism; Introductory Meteorology; Introduction to Continuum Mechanics

After three years of study, when students embark on the second period of co-op work terms, you will meet a student well versed in theoretical concepts and practiced in the application of those concepts.  All students take courses such as Terrestrial Ecosystems, and Biogeography. The student following the life science stream will have studied in-depth topics in ecology such as population ecology, applied plant ecology, and plant evolution, and will have taken at least one field course. Students in the physical sciences stream will have studied topics in atmospheric radiation and thermodynamics, atmospheric chemistry, and atmospheric dynamics.